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The Great Divide

2013-03-06 06:50:00.0

BACK TO BASICS

The Little Black Dress (or LBD) has always been the wild card of any woman’s fashion repertoire – and we have Coco Chanel to thank for that. Introduced in the 1920s, the fashion pioneer transformed a colour traditionally associated with mourning into a staple piece that transcends seasons. Intended to be accessible and easily dressed up or down, the LBD was further cemented into history through Audrey Hepburn’s iconic Givenchy piece in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”. Since then the fashion pack has never looked back. Fresh off the runways to any cocktail event, the LBD has powered its way through decades of seasons reflecting Hepburn’s timeless, cultivated composure.

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SHOP LITTLE BLACK DRESSES_

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Match a body-con silhouette with a monochrome boyfriend blazer and a pair of ankle boots for a more casual look with some serious edge.

Exude confident nonchalance by keeping your ensemble monotone with an oversized clutch and your favourite pair of off-duty sunglasses.

Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” wearing a LBD designed by Hubert de Givenchy (1961)

THE GREAT DIVIDE

A RETROSPECTIVE
OF COCKTAIL CLASSICS

The Little Black Dress has befittingly earned its place in your wardrobe as a forever piece – versatile for any occasion and often a quick fix for many a fashion fiasco. Soon after, its sweeter, fresher counterpart – the Little White Dress – came along and presented itself with that same, wear-me-anywhere appeal. We show you how two contrasting classics can be as sophistically chic as its opposing half.

THE LITTLE BLACK DRESS THE LITTLE WHITE DRESS SHOP LITTLE BLACK DRESSES_ SHOP LITTLE WHITE DRESSES_

BRIGHT WHITE

Designers have long been incorporating the Little White Dress into their line-ups but it wasn’t until Marilyn Monroe’s infamous billowing dress scene in “The Seven Year Itch” that it secured a place as an iconic closet item. Designed by costume designer William Travilla, the LWD embodies the fleeting, flirtatious innocence of Monroe’s character in the movie. Ever since, women have been turning to the LWD as a fresher, summer-ready alternative to its edgier, dark counterpart.

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SHOP LITTLE WHITE DRESSES_

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Achieve polished poise by complementing a tiered LWD with a pair of statement mid-heels and a light scarf.

Bring out your playful side by contrasting an A-line shape with a sharp supply of candy-coloured jewellery and clutch bag to match.

Marilyn Monroe in “The Seven Year Itch” wearing a LWD designed by Willian Travilla (1955)